This website uses cookies to store information on your computer. Some of these cookies are used for visitor analysis, others are essential to making our site function properly and improve the user experience. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Click Accept to consent and dismiss this message or Deny to leave this website. Read our Privacy Statement for more.
Print Page | Contact Us | Sign In | Join
Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society Blog
Blog Home All Blogs
If you have a great topic that you would like to share with your colleagues, or if you are unsure of what you can write about, email Marketing Coordinator Jenna Bertini at jbertini@wocn.org and she will help get you started!

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: WOCN  woc nurse  nursing  ostomy  nurse  education  nurses  continence  WOCN Society  clinical  conference  nursing student  specialty  wound  2015 conference  membership  ostomate  stoma  surgery  3M award  3M Award for excellence in skin safety  annual conference  care  CEC  clinical tool  Guide  hospital  Nashville  NSNA  patient 

Celebrate Back To School With New WOC Courses

Posted By Kristin Petty, Monday, September 16, 2019
Updated: Monday, September 16, 2019

back-to-school-wocn-2019

To celebrate the new school year, the WOCN® Society launched a new continuing education course every day for five days.

As a WOCN Society membership benefit, all members have free access to continuing education courses. If you are a member and know a non-member who would benefit from this discount, please forward this information to them.


Monday, September 16

When the Bladder Does Not Work
Speaker:
Eric Rovner, MD
Contact Hours:
0.99
Pharmacology Credits:
0.09
This session will cover the evaluation and treatment of urinary retention, especially in the female, with emphasis on neurogenic bladder. Urinary retention is a poorly understood condition. Though the causation is generally attributed to either bladder or bladder outlet dysfunction, and an accurate diagnosis is often straightforward, it remains an under diagnosed condition. Treatment is dependent on the underlying causation. Often felt by the medical community to be extraordinarily complex, this session will outline a straight forward approach to the diagnosis and treatment options for the condition.

Tuesday, September 17
Of All the Nerve: Skin and Wound Issues in Neurological Disorders
Speaker:
Janice Beitz, PhD, RN, CS, CNOR, CWOCN-AP, CRNP, APNC, ANEF, FAAN
Contact Hours:
0.94
Pharmacology Credits:
0.21
Because of its relationship with the peripheral, autonomic and central nervous systems, the skin constitutes a neuro-immuno-endocrine organ. Disorders affecting the nervous system directly or secondarily by infection or metabolic disturbances may manifest in the skin. This session will describe four disorders affecting the nervous system with cutaneous manifestations: Diabetes Mellitus, Neurofibromatosis, Parkinson’s Disease, and Syphilis. Pharmacological implications are emphasized.

Wednesday, September 18
Protecting Your Present and Future: Legal Issues, Being a Witness, EMR Documentation
Speaker:
Edward Beitz, Esquire, and Debra Weinrich, RN, Esquire
Contact Hours:
1.39
Errors and omissions in medical documentation can lead to problems in the delivery of medical care, but they can also lead to problems in defending subsequent litigation even when the care itself was properly rendered. This presentation will identify common documentation errors and omissions that are commonly seized upon by plaintiffs attorneys in litigation, strategies to avoid them, and how to deal with any documentation problems in deposition.

Thursday, September 19
Medical Device Related Pressure Injuries: What We Know Today Can Improve the Future
Speaker:
Barbara Delmore, PhD, RN, CWCN, MAPWCA, IIWCC-NYU
Contact Hours:
1.03
Pressure injuries from devices have become a great concern to clinicians as they are challenged with determining strategies to prevent their occurrence. This session will provide the historical perspective for this concern, what it means in today’s practice, and what are the strategies we need to consider to avoid them in the future.

Friday, September 20
Urinary and Fecal Incontinence Assessment and Management in Pediatric Population
Speaker:
Jennifer Beall, PPCNP-BC, and Jessica Lawson, RN, BSN, CWOCN
Contact Hours:
0.87
Pharmacology Credits:
0.22
This session will attempt to describe types of fecal incontinence, causes of fecal incontinence, treatment methods/medications for fecal incontinence, as well as the impact of fecal incontinence on the child and family. We will also be discussing the 3 major types of urinary incontinence in the pediatric population including their clinical presentation, assessment and management including pharm logical and non-pharm logical treatments.

Tags:  CE credits  CEC  continence  education  pharmacy  wound 

Share |
PermalinkComments (1)
 

A Brand New Clinical Tool from the WOCN Society

Posted By Kristin Petty, Friday, September 13, 2019

Introducing the Body Worn Absorbent Product Guide

Despite recent advances in multiple areas of continence management including pharmacotherapy, surgery, physiotherapy, and neuromodulation, evidence suggests that use of incontinence products remains the most prevalent strategy among adults with urinary or fecal incontinence. To address this gap, the WOCN Society developed an evidence- and consensus-based algorithm —The Body Worn Absorbent Product Guide. 

This new clinical tool is an evidence- and consensus-based algorithm for selection, use, and evaluation of body worn absorbent products for the management of individuals with urinary and/or fecal incontinence. This algorithm will help to fill the gap in resources available for first-line and WOC specialty practice nurses guiding optimal use of these products.

 

Learn More About the Guide
Listen to the WOCTalk podcast episode, "A Decision Support Algorithm for Body Worn Absorbent Products (BWAP)". On this episode, we sit down with Mikel Gray, PhD, RN, PNP, FNP, CUNP, CCCN, FAANP, FAAN to discuss BWAPs, the WOCN Society’s Consensus Conference on BWAPs and the Society’s newest decision-making tool, the Body Worn Absorbent Product Guide.


To learn more about the development of this new tool, we invite you to read the article, "Assessment, Selection, Use, and Evaluation of Body Worn Absorbent Products for Adults With Incontinence: A WOCN Society Consensus Conference”, published in the Journal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing (JWOCN): May/June 2018 - Volume 45 - Issue 3 - p 243–264.

 

Interested in learning more about the WOCN Society's newest clinical tool and how to use this tool in your practice? Consider taking a look at the following courses available for FREE in the WOCN Society's Continuing Education Center:

 

The Body Worn Absorbent Product Guide was funded through an educational grant from Domtar. Click here to access the guide.

Tags:  Absorbent  Body  clinical tool  continence  Guide  Product  Worn 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Reasons Why WOC Nurses are Superheroes

Posted By Jenna A. Bertini, Friday, April 12, 2019

It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s a… WOC nurse!

WOCN-19-NurseWeek-Pin-800x80.jpgWhen you think of who typically comes to saves the day, you may think of a fictional superhero from comic books or movies. The reality is that Wound, Ostomy and Continence (WOC) nurses are our everyday heroes! They come to save the day for millions of people living with wound, ostomy and continence care needs. WOC nurses may not have movies or television shows dedicated to them (yet!), but they possess many of the same traits as superheroes. If you are a WOC nurse, if you know a WOC nurse, or if you have been a patient of a WOC nurse you know the truth.

Here are reasons that prove WOC nurses are real life superheroes:

1. They have healing powers

WOC nurses use their clinical expertise to provide intensive physical and emotional care. They help patients return to their normal lives by:

  •  Treating and preventing chronic wounds, pressure ulcers (injuries), venous leg ulcers, diabetes mellitus and surgical wounds.
  • Helping to select pre-operative stoma site marking to ensure post-operative independence, identifying and treating common peristomal skin problems, providing nutritional support, implementing moisture management interventions and teaching individuals how to use pouching systems.
  • Assessing physical, psychological and social aspects of urinary and fecal incontinence, preventing and treating catheter associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) and providing support treatment to help restore continence.

2. They are selfless

To be a nurse, you must love it. WOC nurses are one-of-a-kind. They are dedicated to their patients. Patients honor WOC nurses for the care, kindness, guidance and support they provide. WOC nurses take the time to really get to know their patients to better help understand care for their individual needs. WOC nurses are always there if you ever need anything!

3. They are brave

The healthcare field is not for the faint of heart, and WOC nurses show courage and bravery in many aspects of their career and daily lives. Many of the situations that WOC nurses face include bleak medical conditions, fast-paced decisions that could affect the life of another, hospital protocols and helping soothe scared patients.

4. They are strong

Being a WOC nurse requires both physical and mental strength. They often spend a lot of time on their feet performing physically demanding procedures. WOC nurses remain mentally strong for their patients. WOC nurses constantly provide reassurance and knowledge to help patients become confident and independent in their abilities to move forward with a new way of life.


 If you or a loved one are suffering from a wound that won't heal, facing ostomy surgery, or having problems with incontinence you deserve a Wound, Ostomy and Continence nurse!

Tags:  blog  brave  caring  continence  healing  nurses  nursing  ostomy  selfless  strong  superhero  superpower  woc nurse week  wound 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Listen and Subscribe to WOCTalk, the WOCN Society's Podcast Channel

Posted By Jenna A. Bertini, Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Introducing WOCTalk, a Podcast Channel Courtesy of the WOCN® Society

As clinical experts, leaders and passionate caregivers, it can sometimes be a challenge to find the time to stay up-to-date on the latest healthcare advances, industry news and education. The WOCN Society recognizes that WOC nurses have limited time during, and even after their working hours, and we are dedicated to finding new ways to help support your practice-- that is why we are pleased to introduce our new podcast channel, WOCTalk.

WOCTalk is your opportunity to learn more about advocacy, education, and research that supports the practice and delivery of expert healthcare to individuals with wound, ostomy, and continence care needs—in a new, easily digestible format.

What is a podcast? 

If you are unfamiliar with what a podcast is, just think of an audio program (such as a music or news program) that is similar to a radio show, but available for download over the Internet or through an app store on a computer or mobile device.

How can you listen to WOCTalk?


Download/Subscribe on Apple Podcasts

Download/Subscribe on Google Podcasts

Download/Subscribe on Android

Download/Subscribe on TuneIn

Download/Subscribe on Stitcher

Download/Subscribe on Spotify

Learn more by visiting wocn.org/podcast

New episodes will be released every two weeks. If you think you'd be a good guest for an upcoming episode, you have an idea to share with us, or you would like your questions or issues addressed in an upcoming episode of WOCTalk, send an email to podcast@wocn.org.

Tags:  audio  channel  continence  continence care  discuss  download  episode  incontinence  interview  listen  nursing  ostomy  ostomy care  podcast  subscribe  WOCTalk  wound  wound care 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

WOCN Society Represented at the National Student Nurses' Association 34th Annual Mid-Year Planning Conference

Posted By Jenna A. Bertini, Monday, February 13, 2017
Updated: Friday, February 10, 2017

Nursing students considering their many options following graduation were introduced to wound, ostomy and continence nursing at the National Student Nurses' Association (NSNA) 34th Annual Mid-Year Planning Conference. More than 600 junior and senior nursing students from across the country attended the conference in Kansas City, Missouri, in November 2016.

WOCN Society member Carolyn Crumley, DNP, RN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN, presented a concurrent student workshop, “Wound, Ostomy & Continence Nursing – WOC Nurses: Who we are, what we do,” which provided an overview of the impact that the WOC specialty has on patient outcomes and the various opportunities for board-certified WOC nurses. Carolyn also participated in a nursing specialty showcase panel presentation, with many students expressing an interest and requesting additional information.

Interestingly enough, in an unusual coincidence, the panel participants who represented eight different nursing specialties included a classmate from each of Carolyn’s nursing education programs – BSN, MSN and DNP!

Read Carolyn’s thoughts on her informative presentation and how she hoped it impacted the students:

1. What is one piece of information you hope attendees took away and found helpful from your student workshop, "WOC Nurses: Who we are, what we do?"

I hope that the nursing students who attended the session gained a better understanding of the WOC specialty nursing practice – whether they were interested in pursuing WOC specialty practice as their career path or in working with WOC nurses within their organization in other capacities. For those attendees who were interested in pursuing the WOC specialty practice, I hope that they found the discussion of the educational and certification options helpful. Finally, I hope that my passion for working with wound, ostomy and continence patients inspired them to seek out an area of nursing in which they feel the same dedication and personal satisfaction.

2. What piece of advice did you provide the students during the Nursing Specialty showcase panel presentation?

I stressed to the students that if you are not experiencing personal fulfillment in a nursing position that you are working in, explore the multitude of other opportunities. And it is not all about how much money that you make!

3. What did you like most about presenting to nursing students at the NSNA conference?

It was inspiring to see a new generation of nurses involved with a professional organization, even prior to graduation! I heard several other presenters who reinforced the benefits of continuing their involvement with the various nursing and specialty organizations.

Tags:  advice  conference  continence  NSNA  nurse  nursing student  ostomy  panel  specialty  WOC Nurse  workshop  wound 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 1 of 2
1  |  2
Join Now Contact Us: info@wocn.org 888-224-WOCN(9626) Advertising

Copyright 2018 Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society™. All rights reserved.

The WOCN® Society is professionally managed by Association Headquarters, a charter accredited association management company.

The Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation.

The Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society is approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number CEP 15115.

The WOCN® Society does not endorse or support products or services.

PLEASE BE ADVISED: The names and contact information for all individuals listed on this site is privileged, confidential information and intended for specific purposes. No one (individual or company) may use any contact information on the WOCN Society website to contact, to distribute information to, or solicit anyone for any reason other than the intended purpose for which the name and contact information is available. Click here to view our detailed Privacy Policy.