This website uses cookies to store information on your computer. Some of these cookies are used for visitor analysis, others are essential to making our site function properly and improve the user experience. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Click Accept to consent and dismiss this message or Deny to leave this website. Read our Privacy Statement for more.
Print Page | Sign In | Join
Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society Blog
Blog Home All Blogs
If you have a great topic that you would like to share with your colleagues, or if you are unsure of what you can write about, email Marketing Coordinator Jenna Bertini at jbertini@wocn.org and she will help get you started!

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: WOCN  woc nurse  nursing  ostomy  education  nurse  nurses  clinical  continence  WOCN Society  conference  wound  nursing student  specialty  2015 conference  membership  ostomate  research  stoma  surgery  WTA  WTA Program  3M award  3M Award for excellence in skin safety  abstract  annual conference  care  CE credits  CEC  clinical tool 

Celebrate Back To School With New WOC Courses

Posted By Kristin Petty, Monday, September 16, 2019
Updated: Monday, September 16, 2019

back-to-school-wocn-2019

To celebrate the new school year, the WOCN® Society launched a new continuing education course every day for five days.

As a WOCN Society membership benefit, all members have free access to continuing education courses. If you are a member and know a non-member who would benefit from this discount, please forward this information to them.


Monday, September 16

When the Bladder Does Not Work
Speaker:
Eric Rovner, MD
Contact Hours:
0.99
Pharmacology Credits:
0.09
This session will cover the evaluation and treatment of urinary retention, especially in the female, with emphasis on neurogenic bladder. Urinary retention is a poorly understood condition. Though the causation is generally attributed to either bladder or bladder outlet dysfunction, and an accurate diagnosis is often straightforward, it remains an under diagnosed condition. Treatment is dependent on the underlying causation. Often felt by the medical community to be extraordinarily complex, this session will outline a straight forward approach to the diagnosis and treatment options for the condition.

Tuesday, September 17
Of All the Nerve: Skin and Wound Issues in Neurological Disorders
Speaker:
Janice Beitz, PhD, RN, CS, CNOR, CWOCN-AP, CRNP, APNC, ANEF, FAAN
Contact Hours:
0.94
Pharmacology Credits:
0.21
Because of its relationship with the peripheral, autonomic and central nervous systems, the skin constitutes a neuro-immuno-endocrine organ. Disorders affecting the nervous system directly or secondarily by infection or metabolic disturbances may manifest in the skin. This session will describe four disorders affecting the nervous system with cutaneous manifestations: Diabetes Mellitus, Neurofibromatosis, Parkinson’s Disease, and Syphilis. Pharmacological implications are emphasized.

Wednesday, September 18
Protecting Your Present and Future: Legal Issues, Being a Witness, EMR Documentation
Speaker:
Edward Beitz, Esquire, and Debra Weinrich, RN, Esquire
Contact Hours:
1.39
Errors and omissions in medical documentation can lead to problems in the delivery of medical care, but they can also lead to problems in defending subsequent litigation even when the care itself was properly rendered. This presentation will identify common documentation errors and omissions that are commonly seized upon by plaintiffs attorneys in litigation, strategies to avoid them, and how to deal with any documentation problems in deposition.

Thursday, September 19
Medical Device Related Pressure Injuries: What We Know Today Can Improve the Future
Speaker:
Barbara Delmore, PhD, RN, CWCN, MAPWCA, IIWCC-NYU
Contact Hours:
1.03
Pressure injuries from devices have become a great concern to clinicians as they are challenged with determining strategies to prevent their occurrence. This session will provide the historical perspective for this concern, what it means in today’s practice, and what are the strategies we need to consider to avoid them in the future.

Friday, September 20
Urinary and Fecal Incontinence Assessment and Management in Pediatric Population
Speaker:
Jennifer Beall, PPCNP-BC, and Jessica Lawson, RN, BSN, CWOCN
Contact Hours:
0.87
Pharmacology Credits:
0.22
This session will attempt to describe types of fecal incontinence, causes of fecal incontinence, treatment methods/medications for fecal incontinence, as well as the impact of fecal incontinence on the child and family. We will also be discussing the 3 major types of urinary incontinence in the pediatric population including their clinical presentation, assessment and management including pharm logical and non-pharm logical treatments.

Tags:  CE credits  CEC  continence  education  pharmacy  wound 

Share |
PermalinkComments (1)
 

A New Beginning

Posted By Jenna A. Bertini, Wednesday, September 21, 2016
Updated: Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Society member Ann-Marie Waechter, BSN, RN, CWCN, MS-BC, is a wound care nurse and volunteer with the global charity Mercy Ships on board the world’s largest private hospital ship, the Africa Mercy. Ann-Marie is writing a series of blogs for the Society and its members to share her experiences on the Africa Mercy and to inspire other nurses. You can read Ann-Marie's first story below.

 

If you have a story you would like to share, please email us at share@wocn.org.



 

A New Beginning


     After a full life of school, study, marriage and raising children, my childhood dream is realized. My husband, Tom, took early retirement two years ago and asked, “How about looking into volunteering for Mercy Ships?” From the age of 10, after reading about the hospital ship, SS Hope, I knew I wanted to be a nurse and someday work on a hospital ship. Maybe because patience is not one of my virtues, I never imagined I would live so much life and see my dream realized at the age of 60! In the fall of 2014, after applying and waiting 18 months for a position to become available, Tom and I reported to Mercy Ships headquarters in Texas for our “Onboarding Training.” We spent five weeks in Texas and then our onboarding group headed for Madagascar for two weeks of required field training. There we began to learn the realities of living and working as a community.

 


Tom and Ann-Marie Waechter volunteer with Mercy Ships onboard the world’s largest private hospital ship, the Africa Mercy. ©Mercy Ships

 

     When we were first contacted with the news that, finally, there were positions for both of us on the ship, we were asked if it mattered to us where the ship was going – it struck me as an odd question. However, for the first time ever, the Africa Mercy sat out in the water with nowhere to go. Originally scheduled to head for Benin, Ebola had broken out in West Africa, leaving the ship unable to fulfill its promise to the government of Benin to spend 10 months in the port of Cotonou. Although the Africa Mercy successfully completes thousands of specialized surgeries each year, we are not equipped to effectively address infectious diseases such as Ebola.


     After a lot of prayers, miracles opened doors and in what would normally take six to 18 months to sign agreements and protocols with a receiving government, Mercy Ships was able to do in five days. The way was open for the Africa Mercy to be welcomed into Toamasina, Madagascar.


     After an amazing 18 months and two field services in Madagascar, we have finally arrived in Benin to fulfill our promise from two years ago. Back in West Africa, where the work of the Africa Mercy has been focused over the years, the crew that has been here before were beaming with excitement as we sailed into the port and capital city of Cotonou – our new home for the next 10 months.

  

The Africa Mercy sails into Cotonou, Benin where the Mercy Ships volunteer crew will provide free surgeries, healthcare training and other services for the next 10 months. ©Mercy Ships / credit: Katie Keegan

 

     Our advance team, already here for three months, and an African band were here to welcome us. Before the end of the day, we will have been welcomed by the First Lady of the country and top officials in a formal ceremony.

 

     And so we begin again… the Africa Mercy, the flagship of Mercy Ships, following the “2,000 year old model of Jesus, to provide hope and healing to the world’s forgotten poor” will stay in Benin for the next 10 months providing specialized surgery to the poorest of the poor, those who would have no other access to the surgical care we provide. The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery published a report in 2015 stating that there are four times as many deaths worldwide resulting from lack of access to safe, affordable surgical and anesthetic care than from malaria, TB and HIV combined. Mercy Ships works to fill that gap.

 

The advance team for Mercy Ships worked in Benin prior to the ship’s arrival to prepare arrangements for the Africa Mercy’s field service. They greet the floating hospital in matching African dress as the vessel sails in to dock in Cotonou. ©Mercy Ships / credit: Katie Keegan


     We docked on a Thursday and by Friday there was a flurry of activity on and off the ship. The five hospital wards, along with the OR complex, with everything secured for sail, have to be unpacked, cleaned, sterilized and setup. The nurses that were already onboard cleaned everything twice with Tristel – and I mean everything. Every wall, ceiling, floor, cabinet, counter, piece of equipment, cord, mattress, bed frame, bin, trash receptacle, bio-waste container and more, was deep cleaned by the nurses who will use these wards to care for the approximate 1,700 patients who will receive surgery on this field service. The pharmacy was opened, cleaned and shipping containers organized with the medications for the field service, for patients and crew alike, along with the lab and radiology.



Our Beninoise crew member, Bio-med technician Emmanuel Essah, presents the Benin Flag to the First Lady of Benin who came to meet the Mercy Ship upon arrival in her country. ©Mercy Ships / credit : Tim Baskerville

 

     A team of people from the United States helped set up all the facilities off the ship, which includes huge tents on the dock housing our admissions, rehab, ponseti and screening teams, as well as our infant feeding program and outpatient clinic. The outpatient clinic is where all our wound care is done and it will by my “home” until June. In town, we have facilities loaned to us by the government for the duration of our stay, which will house the dental clinic, eye clinic and the Hospital Outpatient Extension (H.O.P.E.) Center.


     The flurry of activities included the beginning of screening. For the next three weeks, our team of nurses will pre-screen as many people as they can, who line up outside the screening center to see if their condition fits the criteria of the surgeons who will soon arrive. It is a difficult and emotionally challenging job; possibly the most difficult on the ship. We have a limited number of surgical slots for each surgical specialty: plastics, orthopedics, maxillofacial, general and women’s health.


     Although many people come with surgical conditions, much more come with non-surgical conditions hoping for help. Some are palliative and are followed by our Palliative Care team. Others need surgeries that we are unable to provide. Of the several thousand people waiting in line this first week of screening, 355 were given appointments to be seen by the surgeons. Every person we have to turn away is gut-wrenching. The screening team, along with the entire Africa Mercy community, reminds each other of the lives we have seen changed from the surgeries we are able to provide. The joy we see on the faces of those we are able to serve make it all worthwhile.

 

The dockside tents serve as an extension of the Mercy Ship and will house the outpatient clinic where I will work for the next 10 months. ©Mercy Ships

 

     During the first field service in Madagascar, I served as the Crew Nurse in the Crew Clinic, sharing the same hallway as the hospital. It was a wonderful opportunity to serve and get to know the approximate 400 crew onboard, but my heart longed to work with the patients I saw daily walking the halls, experiencing the miraculous surgeries done by the surgeons who volunteer their time here.


     Thanks to Emory University’s Long Distance Learning Program, and a generous donor who provided enough bandwidth so we could download video on the ship, I was able to begin their Wound Care Program in January 2015. In June when the ship left Madagascar for its two month shipyard period, I headed to Atlanta to do Emory’s Wound Care “Bridge Week.” I am so grateful that the staff at Emory designed a program that made it possible for me to fulfill my second dream – becoming a wound care nurse. Less than a week before we had to return to the ship, I took and passed my certification exam. I became a CWCN!


     During our second field service in Madagascar, I transferred to the outpatient clinic and I love it. It’s the best nursing job I’ve ever had! After all this time, I feel as if I’ve found my place in nursing. Our first surgeries in Benin begin in September and the outpatient clinic will open soon after. Benin is a new beginning – who will we see, what will we see that’s never been seen before, what patients will we come to love, what will cause us struggles, what will bring us joy, what miracles will we see? For now they are only questions, but the entire Africa Mercy crew works with anticipation for the answers soon to come.

 

     For more information about Mercy Ships please go to www.mercyships.org.

Tags:  advance  Africa  Africa Mercy  anesthetic  care  conditions  CWCN  hospital ship  laboratory  medication  Mercy Ships  palliative  patients  pharmacy  radiology  screening  service  surgery  team  woc nurse 

Share |
PermalinkComments (3)
 
Join Now Contact Us: info@wocn.org 888-224-WOCN(9626) Advertising

Copyright 2018 Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society™. All rights reserved.

The WOCN® Society is professionally managed by Association Headquarters, a charter accredited association management company.

The Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society is accredited as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation.

The Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society is approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number CEP 15115.

The WOCN® Society does not endorse or support products or services.

PLEASE BE ADVISED: The names and contact information for all individuals listed on this site is privileged, confidential information and intended for specific purposes. No one (individual or company) may use any contact information on the WOCN Society website to contact, to distribute information to, or solicit anyone for any reason other than the intended purpose for which the name and contact information is available. Click here to view our detailed Privacy Policy.